Story: MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT RECRUITING

Understanding the Recruiting Process

WHAT IS THE BIGGEST MISCONCEPTION HIGH SCHOOL PLAYERS AND FAMILIES HAVE ABOUT THE RECRUITING PROCESS??

RRR: I think that the biggest misconception comes at the very start of the process when a high school player starts receiving recruiting mail.

Initially a prospect begins receiving mail because either his high school coach has recommended him as a potential college prospect or he has made some type of “all-…” type team and college recruiters have picked up on that. He may also be on some type of internet list and because of any or all of the above reasons gets an initial form letter and questionnaire which says to the effect, “Congratulations on an outstanding career…. You have been recommended to us…..please fill out the enclosed questionnaire and return it.”

The prospect and his parents are “fired up” about getting recruited and continue to be excited as more and more of these letters arrive. As soon as the questionnaire gets returned, the university’s “marketing” arm takes over and continues to flood the mailbox with form letters, printed materials, and the all-important camp brochure. The prospect and his parents need to understand THIS DOES NOT MEAN HE IS GETTING RECRUITED AND IT CERTAINLY DOESN’T MEAN HE IS GETTING OFFERED A SCHOLARSHIP. What it does mean is that he is “on the list” of kids getting “evaluated” and at some future point down the road may get contacted on a more personal level.

Until a prospect receives some type of “personalized” contact from a college coach, like hand-written notes, personal email, or in May—a phone call, he should not consider himself “getting recruited”. All those form letters are nice conversation fodder for a proud dad or mom engaging in conversation with their co-workers during coffee breaks, but until the recruiting process escalates into a more personal level, that is all they mean.

WHAT SHOULD THE PROSPECT BE DOING WITH ALL THESE LETTERS?

RRR: #1, the prospect should be thankful that he is receiving recruiting mail, because the schools mailing him do feel he is worthy of being evaluated.
Secondly, he should reply and fill out EVERY questionnaire he receives. Those schools need your home address, phone number, and email address, so that they can contact you directly. Unless your high school coach has some policy that all recruiting contact must go through him, college coaches want to correspond with you at home. That is particularly important over the approaching summer months, when you may or may not see your high school coach on a regular basis.
#3, he should be noting the dates on the various summer camp brochures that he is receiving, so that he can begin making plans to attend those that he wants, because summer camps are all part of the evaluation process.